DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

Content Standards:

1.1  Physical and chemical properties and changes

6.4  The law of conservation of energy; endothermic and exothermic processes

 

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.
User-uploaded Content
DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

Chemistry Content (What is Calorimetry?)

Content:

1.   Understanding of energy measurements contained within a food sample.

-          4 Cal of energy in 1 g of protein

-          4 Cal of energy in 1 g of carbohydrates

-          9 Cal of energy in 1 g of fat

2.   Food is the source of energy for the body.  Body breaks down complicated bonds of molecules within a food sample using biological enzymes to release energy that the body uses to function.  

3.   Use of a bomb calorimeter in food science to measure the amount of energy released by a food sample when burnt.  System is in a container completely surrounded by water.  Measurement of the temperature change in water is plugged into the equation taught in this lesson to determine the amount of heat released. 

4.   Heat Capacity is the amount of heat required to change the temperature of 1 g of a substance by 1 degree Celsius.  The heat capacity for water is unusually high.  To raise the temperature of a metal, one needs to add only a little heat, where as a great amount of heat is required to raise the temperature of water by 1 degree.   This is why it takes so long for a large body of water, like the ocean, to rise in temperature.

 

Vocabulary:

                Exothermic:  system releases energy in the form of heat to its

                        surroundings.

                Endothermic:  system absorbs energy in the form of heat from its

                        surroundings. 

                1 Calorie = 4.184 Joule

Calorie:  a calorie is the amount of energy required to raise the temperature of 1 g of water by 1 degree Celsius. 

 

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.
Example Image
DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

Types of Food (Medieval Times)


Food was VERY different in Medieval Times.  Cereal, McDonald's, Subway (etc...) were not the foundation of the diet for the people of Medieval France.  Staples in the diet for people of Medieval France included various types of Meat (Pig, Poultry, Beef, Lamb, Venison...) and Vegetables (Onions, Garlic and Herbs). 

 

WHAT YOU EAT = YOUR SOCIAL CLASS

Rich people (such as Kings and Nobles) had a vast, diverse diet, including most of the items mentioned above.  Poor people (such as Serfs or Subvassells) had very little to eat.  Their diet typically included dark bread (no white bread allowed!), oatmeal, and pork. 

 

library.thinkquest.org...

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.