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Rationale:

       The reason for studying this unit is simple.  It is essential for students to recognize how content areas are linked.  By teaching our students about Medieval France through an Interdisciplinary Unit, we are setting a precedent for students to look at content areas in a given discipline through a perspective of another field of study.  Furthermore, students working towards an understanding of the culture of Medieval France through our interdisciplary unit will have the opportunity to experience the Fedual System of government and make abstract comparisons between historical government systems and the way government exists today. 

 

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.
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DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

Discipline-Specific Rationale:

History:

The purpose of this lesson is to give students an understanding of the social structure that existed in the middle ages, namely the concept of feudalism. People of all classes lived so differently and this will offer students an alternate perspective. They will be able to add this knowledge to their larger concepts of being part of a society and the differences between citizenship then and now.

 

English:

The unit is designed to help students understand how medieval culture/history is reflected in literature. Art can be a medium to keep history alive in an engaging and exciting way.

 

Mathematics:

Every culture’s weaponry was based on the technology and raw materials available at the time. The most fearsome weapons were bows, swords, and war axes. Since all three categories of weaponry have the function of being aimed at a target, or opponent, students need to understand the thinking that goes behind using a weapon effectively. This lesson centers around the important idea of calculating the probability of hitting uniform targets when preparing for battles and how this probability is affected when outside factors are considered to become a non uniform distribution.

 

Mathematics:

In Medieval Europe, the Bubonic, or Black Plague was spreading quickly, but exactly how fast was it?  The food the less wealthy people were eating was often rotten or unhealthy, but just how much bacteria did it contain?  This math unit focuses on exponential growth and decay, specifically focusing on the spread of the Black Plague in Europe in the mid-fourteenth century. Students will come to appreciate how quickly some diseases can spread, and using exponential growth models they can predict how much damage a disease can do in a short amount of time.

 

Mathematics:

A large advancement in weaponry arose with the development of the medieval catapult.  With this high-tech contraption armies could produce enough force to throw very large and heavy rocks or other objects towards the opposing army.  These rocks could damage buildings or be heaved over walls to penetrate good defenses.  Students will explore the motion of such projectiles and discover ways to determine how far a rock might travel, how long it will be in the air, and the best angle to shoot an object to obtain the maximum distance possible.

 

Chemistry:

Students develop understanding of material most completely when they are able to relate content to their own lives. Calorimetry is the study of the burning of food samples to measure the amount of energy stored within a food sample. This relates directly to the body's ability to break down the food and extract energy from chemical bonds. Students will relate the foods they eat today to a series of foods consumed by people of different classes in Medieval Times. Students will use this knowledge to participate in a game where their ability to answer questions depends on the amount of food they consume and allow their body to convert to physical energy.

 

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.