DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

I've loved computers ever since I first used one as a child, and was delighted to learn to program in BASIC around the age of six. My family didn't have our own computer in the house in those days, but I was so excited at the thought of making my own text-based computer game that I wrote several pages' worth of BASIC code on an electric typewriter. I never actually entered any of it into a computer and there's no way it would have worked properly if I had, but so began a lifelong interest in making computers do new and interesting things. When we finally did get computers of our own, I coded several real games - including a graphical Commodore 64 video game as a science-fair project. 

 

I stopped thinking of myself as a tech person during my master's and PhD degrees, just because I didn't have time to tinker and make it work properly (especially after a failed attempt to be productive with Red Hat Linux). Then one day at my wife's family Christmas gathering, as I was trying to figure out how to move beyond the faculty job market, I realized in mid-conversation that everyone had left the room except for me and her old family friend - because the two of us had gotten into a heated discussion about operating systems. Turns out I was a techie after all.

 

So it only made sense that I would get back into computers in more depth as I moved on from the faculty track. I've had many professional and personal projects in computers over the years, and once I arrived at BU it seemed only natural to start a new degree in computer science - even though that would be my fifth postsecondary degree. (I sometimes quip that I'm collecting the whole set.) I've included the personal statement that I submitted with my application, and some descriptions of the courses that I've been taking.

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.