DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

The traditional academic publishing process has left much to be desired. Scholars nearly always publish for free or close to it, but journals and books are only made available to a select few at a very high price. That system made some sense when printing presses were expensive scarce resources. But now, anyone who has something to say can go out and say it, and anyone with an internet connection can hear it. The benefits of this for scholars, especially scholars in poor countries, are enormous.

 

I'm looking forward to what this will make possible in the future and I try to do my part to support open access. I've made my dissertation publicly available to all who wish to read it (and wrote a blog post explaining at more length why I did so). I also wrote a peer-reviewed article on Śāntideva - the thinker I studied in the dissertation - for the Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy, available to all the public. When publishing more recent articles about Śāntideva's views on metaphysics and politics, I chose to publish it to the free online Journal of Buddhist Ethics rather than older, more established venues, so that it would be available to all who wanted to read it. Naturally, my scholarly blogs (both Love of All Wisdom and the Indian Philosophy Blog) are both open-access, and I gave a talk at the Digital Classicist Seminar New England Spring 2015 on how the Indian Philosophy Blog balances cost and quality in open access.

 

I haven't limited open-access publishing to text, either. Via New Books in Buddhist Studies, I've published several audio podcast interviews with the authors of scholarly books on Buddhism, including Jason Clower, Charles Prebish and David McMahan

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.