DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

For most of my life, philosophy - especially cross-cultural philosophy - has been my driving passion. I am fascinated by the biggest questions of life: how human beings should live, what it is to really know something. My path into the field has been long and a little complicated. The short version is that I learned significant lessons at a young age from a Buddhism that seemed incompatible with what I'd learned in Western philosophy to that point, and tried to put them together. I pursued a doctoral degree in religious studies rather than philosophy for the simple reason that Indian philosophy tends to get studied in religion and not philosophy departments. Since the degree, though, I have also come to see how relevant the various practices identified as "religious" are to philosophical inquiry. 

 

Like most doctoral students, I expected that I was headed for a career as a tenured professor. Also like most humanities doctoral students, I ended up doing something different. Educational technology has become a fulfilling career for me and I am happy with it. I have recently found an additional opportunity to teach the introductory  Indian philosophy course at BU. But just as importantly to me, I have made the time to continue writing, reading and thinking about philosophy as an avocation, neither career nor hobby - unpaid work that is as serious and important to me as anything I get paid for. A key philosophical project for me these days is blogging - both the shared Indian Philosophy Blog and my biweekly personal philosophy blog, Love of All Wisdom, where I've now been posting reflections for over four years. But I've also continued writing articles, going to conferences and more. Finding time for all this while working as a full-time educational technologist has been difficult, for sure - but easier than it was when I was a visiting professor teaching four courses a semester. So I have no regrets.

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.