DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

Digital scholarly networking, for humanities scholars at least, begins with stodgy old email - a straightforward technology that soldiers on to this day and shows no signs of going away. I joined the Religion in South Asia (RISA-L) scholarly email list before I even began my graduate work in South Asian traditions, and have been an active participant in the thirteen years since. RISA remains the centre for online scholarship of South Asian traditions. For almost as long, I've also been part of the more formally structured H-BUDDHISM, which has played a similarly important role for scholars of Buddhist studies. I note that scholars in the tech-savvy field of digital humanities also still rely heavily on a mailing list (HUMANIST), which I'm also part of - along with the POD Network list for pedagogy.

 

In the past couple years, H-BUDDHISM has been supplemented by a more freewheeling Facebook group for scholars of Buddhist studies. Facebook has come a long way since I joined it in 2006, when it felt like a private club for people under 35. It's now also home to a lively group of scholars interested in method and theory in the study of religion. I'm active in both Facebook groups and expect more scholarly discussion to happen there in the future. 

 

My philosophy blog Love of All Wisdom is its own form of scholarly social networking. Dedicated readers of blogs tend to be aware of new blog posts through RSS readers, but I've aimed at reaching an audience wider than that. As well as email subscription options, I try to make sure that I announce every new substantive post on Facebook, Google+, Academia.edu and my philosophy Twitter feed (@loveofallwisdom). I also comment regularly about the conditions of scholarship on my work-related Twitter feed (@amodlele).  Both feeds are reproduced below. 

 

My biggest initiative in scholarly social networking to date has been to create the Indian Philosophy Blog, together with Elisa Freschi. The IPB is currently the only scholarly group blog in the field of Indian philosophy, modelled after the very successful Chinese-philosophy blog Warp, Weft and Way. Elisa and I collectively invited the large group of junior scholars that make up the blog, who worked together to set its rules; I have handled all the technical side of the blog in WordPress. I presented about the blog with fellow organizer Matthew Dasti at the Digital Classicist Seminar New England, Spring 2015.

 

I've also helped scholars get together online when I maintained the website for the Society for Asian and Comparative Philosophy between 2010 and 2012. The Versatile PhD (formerly WRK4US) community was very helpful for me in figuring out a post-faculty career path. I now have pages on other sites for scholarly communication like PhilPapers, ResearchGate and Google Scholar, and am excited to see what lies ahead.

 

 

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.


DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.


DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.