DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

I will always remember my first day in a teaching job. I was 22, a new teaching assistant, doing my master's at Cornell, and we had just been through a one-day introductory workshop for teachers, focusing in particular on diversity and inclusiveness. It didn't seem like it would be hard to do, so I'd just scribbled together a note or two on what the class might involve. I felt confident as I walked into the classroom, until one thought struck me: there are twenty people in here who all expect me to know exactly what I'm doing. The implications of that kind of pressure had just not occurred to me. In an instant I felt panicked, and I wound up stammering my way through the class. I learned a lesson I would carry with me long afterwards: teaching is hard, and the more prepared we can be for it, the better.

 

Things got better soon. I threw myself into pedagogical development, spending more time on learning to teach than most of my peers. All of that would be important and useful, first because I would end up teaching students for nine years, and then because pedagogy is so central to an educational technologist's work. I came to develop a teaching philosophy informed by my years of teaching in philosophy and religious studies, and to experiment with different teaching methods. At the moment you could say I'm not teaching as such, but really a great deal of an educational technologist's work is teaching; I'm just teaching faculty instead of students.

 

If you'd like to see how students have reacted to my teaching, here are some student evaluations I received as a professor of Hindu tradition at Stonehill, and as a TA for a Harvard course on the history of Western philosophy and theology.

 

 

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.