DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.
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DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.
DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.
DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.
DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

Welcome to APA. You Must Be New Here.

Professor Queen recommended that we learn the citation style used by our respective majors and use it starting in our first essays. Apparently, International Relations uses the APA citation system. Having been brutally trained in the nuances of MLA throughout my entire writing career, I balked at the idea of changing my habits. The (?) seen in the screenshot below shows up frequently in all of my drafts, but slowly, I learned the basics of the system. I discovered that the nifty citation guide I had used since high school contains an entire section dedicated to APA. It can be viewed in Helpful Links. Of course, when the Internet cannot provide the answer, I knew I could always ask my classmates or Professor Queen for help. APA has pleasantly surprised me as being more sensible than MLA, and I look forward to taking this new writing skill into future classes.

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.
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DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

Research Changes Arguments For the Better

As I said in my introduction, the concept of research as a process was completely foreign to me. Research happened once, maybe twice, and the rest was all writing. When dealing with subjects as complex as First Amendment scholarship, this approach will never work. As I soon found out, sometimes research does not clarify a point. It deletes it. The opinion represented by the following screenshot proved too flawed to keep in light of new research, so I revised it into a completely different point for the second draft.

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.
User-uploaded Content
DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.