DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

 

           James Bond, a figure still popular today, is a secret agent and throughout his journey (in novel or film) he encouonters many major events from WWII through the cold war.  In the 14 novels by Iam Flemming, as well as collections of short stories, it is revealed that Bond has been in most major conflicts of WWII and after before he became a spy.  When examined by a doctor, he is asked if he had suffered a major fall. His response:  ‘Perhaps.’ Inwardly he reflected that the ‘bad fall’ had probably been when he had had to jump from the Arlberg Express after Heinkel and his friends had caught up with him around the time of the Hungarian uprising in 1956.” (Thunderball, Chapter 2, Pan Books Ltd., 1963, p. 21) 

          These popular novels were made into films, both provide entertainment to the masses from the 1950's through the Cold War and are still beloed today. They seemed a respite from the constant reminder that Communism was out to get them; however, it is clear that the same messages are being conveyed in these works.  

 

 

 

 Comic books  have a long history intertwined with current events in America and were another popular source where propaganda was able to flourish.  In comic books, while heros were strong with a core of American values who save the world from evil and corruption, they were products of radiation a clear comment on other risks of nuclear bombs.  The Marvel superhero comic that came to dominate the comic book industry for most of the last five decades was born under the mushroom cloud of potential nuclear war that was a cornerstone of the four-decade bipolar division of the world between the US and USSR. These stories were consciously set in this world and reflect the changing culture of Cold War (and post-Cold War) America.

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.