DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

This section contain most of the sources that were used. It gives some background info on the sources and how they were used for this portfolio.

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

Source 1 (title): Dueling scenes and terms in Shakespeare's plays

Call Number: PR3069.D8F40

Author: Craig, Horace S.

Publisher & City of Publication: University of California Press Berkeley

Year of Publication: 1940

 

This source mentions the scenes of the various Shakespeare plays where a form of dueling occurs. The source does not limit itself to only one of Shakespeare's play but to most if not all the plays of Shakespeare that contain dueling scenes. The main scenes that will be focused on are the scenes where fencing is used by the characters in the scene. This source also contains the vocabulary related to fencing and the words that are associated with fencing (fencing jargon).

This source will be used to find other possible sources as well as give me an intro to some fencing vocabulary. The scenes that should be focused on will be decided through this source. This will get me started and put me in the right direction toward my goal.

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

Source 2 (title): The theory and practice of fencing

Call Number: U860.F611

Author: Castello, Julio Martinez

Publisher & City of Publication: C. Scribner's Sons & New York

Year of Publication: 1933

 

This source as the title suggests is about the theory behind fencing and is a manual showing how to do the moves. It has an in-depth analysis on the moves and shows the motions specifically. The diagrams are very detailed and help with teaching fencing. This goes into the history as well but not that in-depth. It also gives some basic information on the sport of modern fencing.

This source will primarily be used to analyze the moves in Shakespeare's plays and understand which moves give the most suspension to the audience. The theory of the modern art of fencing is much different from back then. This issue will also be discussed as well through this source. 

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

Source 3 (title): The modern art of fencing

Call Number: U860.E22

Author: Rolando, Guzman

Publisher & City of Publication: S Leigh: London

Year of Publication: 1822

 

The modern art of fencing is significantly different from the fencing of Shakespeare. This is because modern fencing has devloped into a sport and competition where the two fencers are opponents trying to hack away at each other. In Shakespeare's plays, the two fencers worked together and coordinated their moves together to create a fluid, suspenseful fight scene. The modern fencing competitions (on Home page of portfolio) do not incite excitement but rather are kind of tedious and is not fluid. This source also talks about how modern fencing has a point system for each individual fencer.

This source will primarily be used to determine the differences between modern fencing and Shakespeare's fencing and how and why it evolved. It will be also used to identify the modern stage combats like wrestling that were derived from Shakespeare's stage combat and the similarities will be identified. 

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

Source 4 (title): Sword and Masque

Call Number: U860.F67

Author: Palffy-Alpar, Julius

Publisher & City of Publication: F. A. Davis Company; Philadelphia

Year of Publication: 1967

 

This source contains a huge section on the history of fencing and how it evolved over time. The detailed history begins from the early middle ages all the way through to the twentieth century. The second section contains some general advice and some theories on fencing (psychology, manner, analysis of movement). This source deeply goes over the moves associated witht the three different weapons of fencing, the epee, the saber and the foil. The last section talks about theatrical fencing and analyzes some scenes of Shakespeare's plays.

The last section is going to be primarily used from this source. It deeply analyzes the fencing scene in Hamlet including each of the fencing moves that were done in that scene.

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

Source 5 (title): The Sword in the Age of Chivalry

Call Number: U854.O2

Author: Oakeshott, R.

Publisher & City of Publication: Frederick A. Praeger; New York and Washington

Year of Publication: 1965

 

This source is a book about the different types of swords and the different parts of the swords in the medieval period. It talks about the swords of group 1 (1050-1350) and the swords of group 2 (1350-1550). The author accurately describes the specific details of each type of blade in each of these groups. The next three chapters depict the pommel-forms, the cross-guards, and the grip and scabbard. There is a lot of historical details included in the description of each of the swords. For example, it gives details on some prominent figures in the past who used the weapon.

This source will be used to compare the swords in this source with the swords that were used in Shakespeare's plays, especially in the fencing scene in Hamlet. This will help me determine why the type of swords in Shakespeare's plays were used in the stage combat and why other types could not be used on the stage.

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

Source 6 (title): Paradoxes of Defence

Call Number: U860.F33

Author: Silver, G

Publisher & City of Publication: Oxford University Press: London

Year of Publication: 1933

 

This source contains the ideas and thoughts of fencing and stage combat back in Shakespeare's times in Europe. It is a fact source, explaining some moves, the styles of fencing used, and the weapons used. For example, it explicates that the sword and dagger were used simultaneously back in Shakespeare's times, instead of using just a sword.

 

This source will be used to find out more about Shakespeare's stage combat and the fencing back in Shakespeare's era. It will also be used to compare the differences between modern fencing and fencing in Shakespeare's plays.

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

Source 7 (title): Hamlet

Call Number: N/A

Author: Shakespeare, William

Publisher & City of Publication: Frederick A. Praeger; New York and Washington

Year of Publication: 1968

 

This source is a famous play of Shakespeare's. It is well known for its fighting scenes. This has a great long stage combat scene that can be analyzed.

This source is my most important source because my thesis is based on the fencing scene in this play. This is an exhibit source and the other fact sources will be used to analyze this fencing scene in this play. The specific scene will contain many of the concepts from the fact sources. Each move will be analyzed using my sources that will lead me to the answers of the questions in my research prospectus.

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.